San Bernardino Election Results 2018


San Bernardino Election Results 2018

2018-11-15T09:41:31+00:00November 15th, 2018|Advocacy, Local Updates|

It has been one week since the November 6th election and the results are in! The ballots have been mailed, the polls were visited, votes have been counted. Your city has cast their vote and here are your results for the city of San Bernardino’s election 2018:

The race for Mayor was a close one. However, in the end John Valdivia coming up as the new Mayor of San Bernardino. Residents favored him with 51.21% of votes.

In Ward 1 Theodore Sanchez came out as victor by obtaining 57.56% of votes.

Sandra Ibarra wins 63.44% of votes needed in order to secure her spot as Council member for Ward 2.

In Ward 4 Fred Shorett wins with 53% of votes over Alexandra Beltrans 47% of votes.

Residents voted Yes on Measure CC for the San Bernardino Community College in which they were in favor of allowing the community college district to issue $470 million in bonds, with an estimated tax of 2.5 cents per $100 of assessed value, to fund facility upgrades.This measure obtained 61.17% of the votes.

Residents voted Yes on Measure W  and were in favor of allowing the city to impose a tax on marijuana businesses of up to $10.00 per square foot for nurseries and up to 6 percent of gross receipts for other businesses. The Yes vote had 64.44% of the votes.

Lastly, residents voted Yes on Measure X and were in favor of this measure to amend and reenact a city ordinance establishing regulations on marijuana business, including a cap on the number of marijuana businesses that may operate in the city. The Yes vote had 60.30% of votes.

Your California proposition results:

State Proposition 1:

California voted No and opposed this measure to authorize $4 billion in general obligation bonds for housing-related programs, loans, grants, and projects and housing loans for veterans. The No vote won by 5.32% over the Yes vote.

State Proposition 2:

California voted Yes and supported authorizing the state to use revenue from Proposition 63 (2004)—a 1 percent tax on income above $1 million for mental health services—on $2 billion in revenue bonds for homelessness prevention housing for persons in need of mental health services. The Yes vote won by 9.56% over the No vote.

State Proposition 3:

California voted No and opposed this measure to authorize $8.877 billion in general obligation bonds for water infrastructure, groundwater supplies and storage, surface water storage and dam repairs, watershed and fisheries improvements, and habitat protection and restoration. The No vote won by 9.32% over the Yes vote.

State Proposition 4:

California voted Yes and supported authorizing $1.5 billion in bonds for the construction, expansion, renovation, and equipping of children’s hospitals in California. The Yes vote won by 14.20% over the No vote.

State Proposition 5:

California voted No and opposed amending Proposition 13 (1978) to change how tax assessments are transferred between properties for homebuyers who are age 55 or older or severely disabled. The No vote won by 4.04% over the Yes vote.

State Proposition 6:

California voted Yes and supported this initiative to repeal fuel tax increases and vehicle fees that were enacted in 2017, including the Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017 (RRAA) and require voter approval (via ballot propositions) for the California State Legislature to impose, increase, or extend fuel taxes or vehicle fees in the future.The Yes vote won by 14.8% over the No vote.

State Proposition 7:

California voted Yes and supported allowing the California State Legislature to (1) change the dates and times of the daylight saving time (DST) period, as consistent with federal law, by a two-thirds vote and (2) establish permanent, year-round DST in California by a two-thirds vote if federal law is changed to allow for permanent DST. The Yes vote won by 13.16% over the No vote.

State Proposition 8:

California voted No and opposed requiring dialysis clinics to issue refunds to patients or patients’ payers for revenue above 115 percent of the costs of direct patient care and healthcare improvements. The No vote won by 34.36% over the Yes vote.

State Proposition 10:

California voted No and  opposed the initiative, thus keeping the Costa-Hawkins Rental Housing Act and continuing to prohibit local governments from enacting rent control on certain buildings. The No vote won by 38.48% over the Yes vote.

State Proposition 11:

California voted Yes and supported allowing ambulance providers to require workers to remain on-call during breaks paid at their regular rate. The Yes vote won by 25.04% over the No vote.

State Proposition 12:

California voted Yes and supported this initiative to establish minimum space requirements based on square feet for calves raised for veal, breeding pigs, and egg-laying hens and ban the sale of (a) veal from calves, (b) pork from breeding pigs, and (c) eggs from hens when the animals are confined to areas below minimum square-feet requirements. The Yes vote won by 15.08% over the No vote.

New measures will be taking place and new members of your council will be stepping up. The November Elections proved to be tough. It gave voters more to think about and possibly inspired many more to take action and finally cast their votes.

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